Warning: explode() expects parameter 2 to be string, array given in /home3/smithmot/public_html/RIZZLEKICKS.INFO/wp-content/plugins/cloogooq/cloogooq.php on line 425
RizzleKicks.Info

Updated

August 26, 2016 20:44:43

Melbourne writer A.S. Patrić has won the 2016 Miles Franklin Literary Award for his debut novel, Black Rock White City.

Patrić will take home $60,000 for winning the nation’s top prize for fiction with his work which highlights the immigration experience in Australia.

He took out the prize ahead of other award-winning writers, Peggy Frew, Myfanwy Jones, Lucy Treloar and Charlotte Wood.

The book is set in the 1990s and follows the life of a couple, a former poet and academic, who escape war-torn Yugoslavia and end up living in Melbourne as cleaners.

Commenting on behalf of the judging panel, Richard Neville from the State Library of NSW said the work offered a “powerful and raw” account of the migrant experience in Australia.

The award, which aims to support Australian writers, was established in 1954 through the bequest of My Brilliant Career author, Miles Franklin.

Patrić, who is a bookseller in St Kilda, was shortlisted for the 2013 Queensland Literary Awards for his collection of short stories, Las Vegas for Vegans.

Accepting the award in Melbourne tonight, Patrić said it was “good to be in this reality”.

He said the book took him more than six years to write, congratulated the other finalists and said Australian literature was “vibrant, vigorous and brave”.

His two young daughters, dressed in tutus, hugged him as he went to accept the award.

Topics:

arts-and-entertainment,

awards-and-prizes,

melbourne-3000,

st-kilda-3182

First posted

August 26, 2016 20:25:45

Posted

August 26, 2016 15:15:39

A Melbourne council has banned people playing Pokemon Go from a construction site for their own safety.

The city of Knox in Melbourne’s east said hundreds of people have been converging on a site in Ferntree Gully where a lake is being refurbished.

The influx of players has been hampering the works, so the council declared a “Pokemon STOP” area.

Knox Council Mayor Tony Holland said works were disrupted at the lake site at the Tim Neville Arboretum on Dorset Road by “hundreds of people converging on the site to play Pokemon Go”.

‘Plain dangerous’

“People are disregarding the fences we have in place to protect the community from an active construction site,” he said.

“That’s just plain dangerous for everyone and has to stop”.

The council said Victoria Police was aware of its concerns and is carrying out patrols in the area.

Cr Holland called on the game’s maker Nintendo Co to take responsibility for keeping game players away from dangerous areas.

“Our contractor has contacted operators of the game to make sure the location is not a magnet for players anymore,” Cr Holland said.

Topics:

games,

arts-and-entertainment,

mobile-phones,

information-and-communication,

disasters-and-accidents,

local-government,

ferntree-gully-3156

Updated

August 26, 2016 14:11:54

The recent series of burkini bans in resorts across France was met with sensationalist global headlines about protecting national security and women’s lives. The interdiction does not protect either of these. Instead, it reinforces tired stereotypes about Muslim women.

Mayor of Cannes David Linsard was the first to introduce restrictions on the burkini, a full body garment worn predominantly by Muslim beach-goers who wish to preserve their modesty.

Women wearing the swimwear in the popular Riviera city have now started to receive fines of $56.

Then a seaside resort on the French island of Corsica became yet another to ban the burkini. The town’s mayor, Ange-Pierre Vivon, commented on the ban claiming that “Islamist fundamentalists have no business” on the Mediterranean island.

The announcement in Corsica followed a brawl reportedly sparked by people taking pictures of women wearing burkinis.

All this comes five years after the total niqab ban was introduced across France, and more than a decade after conspicuous religious symbols, including Islamic headscarves, were banned from French public schools.

Rehashing well-rehearsed arguments from the previous anti-veiling campaigns, supporters of the burkini ban have backed the decision by calling the garment a symbol of threatening fundamentalist sentiment.

As such, they denounced the burkini as harmful to the French idea of laïcité (secularism), national security and gender equality.

Politically convenient demonisation of Islam

“I simply forbid a uniform that is the symbol of Islamic extremism,” said Mr Lisnard. But comparing burkini-wearers to the adherents of menacing political organisations has little basis in reality.

Worn voluntarily and sold by popular high street and haute couture brands alike, burkinis have become a widespread sartorial choice for many practicing Muslim women in France and beyond.

Being praised for blocking sun-rays and the male gaze, the attire is often also embraced by non-Muslim women, most notably also by TV chef Nigella Lawson.

By incorrectly labelling the burkini as a terrorist attire, Mr Lisnard and the supporters of the ban have resorted to a tiresome single story about Islam and its followers.

Their comments cling to partial and often dangerously warped fragments of Islam-inspired atrocities. They generalise them and attribute them to the entire Muslim population, and cast all Muslims as a potentially dangerous “other”, with no place in Western society.

This is politically convenient. It creates an image of national enemies and justifies moral crusades against Muslims at home and abroad.

From inserting a false notion of protecting public order, to rationalising the bombing of distant nations, the demonisation of Muslims can provide an instant gain of much-needed votes in times of political crisis.

The myth of saving Muslim women

The advocates of the burkini ban not only allege that all wearers are adherents of radical Islamist ideas. They also suppose that burkini-clad women are necessarily the victims of these political systems, which force them into complying with their patriarchal laws.

Valerie Boyer, a member of the National Assembly of France, who was among those who welcomed the ban, proclaimed the burkini a “gender prison“.

The socialist government’s minister for women’s rights, Laurence Rossignol, echoed these sentiments by claiming that the burkini “is the beach version of the burqa and it has the same logic: hide women’s bodies in order to better control them”.

Both politicians enunciate a highly patronising notion: the concept of Muslim women needing to be saved. Stemming from colonial legacies, the idea of liberating veiled women by removing their veils has been deployed numerous times.

From the French colonisation of Algeria to the NATO invasion of Afghanistan, racially charged images of veiled women have constituted a vital component of Western war propaganda.

Oppressive language

Amid the burkini controversies, the media in France and across Europe has published images from the liberated Syrian town of Manjib.

The photographs depict women celebrating the departure of the Islamic State group (IS) by burning their burqas in public. Many media outlets were quick to make comparisons between burned veils and the burkini ban.

Whether talking about mandatory face-veils in war-torn Syria, or voluntary burkinis in French resorts, the media’s language about Muslim women appears strikingly similar.

Muslim women are portrayed as universally oppressed and in need of intervention from Western saviours.

This type of rhetoric gives little space for acknowledging that women not only choose to wear certain types of attire, but might also have a different definition of freedom.

While for some it might be about exposing their bodies and not being ashamed about it, for others freedom comes in the form of protecting modesty.

A Eurocentric view of the veil as a universal symbol of oppression misses the opportunity to acknowledge the diversity of female and feminist agency that comes in various shapes and forms. Burkinis can be part of that.

Pina Sadar is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at Durham University.

Originally published in The Conversation.

Topics:

fashion,

religion-and-beliefs,

islam,

france

First posted

August 26, 2016 13:13:49

Posted

August 26, 2016 13:13:49

The recent series of burkini bans in resorts across France was met with sensationalist global headlines about protecting national security and women’s lives. The interdiction does not protect either of these. Instead, it reinforces tired stereotypes about Muslim women.

Mayor of Cannes David Linsard was the first to introduce restrictions on the burkini, a full body garment worn predominantly by Muslim beach-goers who wish to preserve their modesty.

Women wearing the swimwear in the popular Riviera city have now started to receive fines of $56.

Then a seaside resort on the French island of Corsica became yet another to ban the burkini. The town’s mayor, Ange-Pierre Vivon, commented on the ban claiming that “Islamist fundamentalists have no business” on the Mediterranean island.

The announcement in Corsica followed a brawl reportedly sparked by people taking pictures of women wearing burkinis.

All this comes five years after the total niqab ban was introduced across France, and more than a decade after conspicuous religious symbols, including Islamic headscarves, were banned from French public schools.

Rehashing well-rehearsed arguments from the previous anti-veiling campaigns, supporters of the burkini ban have backed the decision by calling the garment a symbol of threatening fundamentalist sentiment.

As such, they denounced the burkini as harmful to the French idea of laïcité (secularism), national security and gender equality.

Politically convenient demonisation of Islam

“I simply forbid a uniform that is the symbol of Islamic extremism,” said Mr Lisnard. But comparing burkini-wearers to the adherents of menacing political organisations has little basis in reality.

Worn voluntarily and sold by popular high street and haute couture brands alike, burkinis have become a widespread sartorial choice for many practicing Muslim women in France and beyond.

Being praised for blocking sun-rays and the male gaze, the attire is often also embraced by non-Muslim women, most notably also by TV chef Nigella Lawson.

By incorrectly labelling the burkini as a terrorist attire, Mr Lisnard and the supporters of the ban have resorted to a tiresome single story about Islam and its followers.

Their comments cling to partial and often dangerously warped fragments of Islam-inspired atrocities. They generalise them and attribute them to the entire Muslim population, and cast all Muslims as a potentially dangerous “other”, with no place in Western society.

This is politically convenient. It creates an image of national enemies and justifies moral crusades against Muslims at home and abroad.

From inserting a false notion of protecting public order, to rationalising the bombing of distant nations, the demonisation of Muslims can provide an instant gain of much-needed votes in times of political crisis.

The myth of saving Muslim women

The advocates of the burkini ban not only allege that all wearers are adherents of radical Islamist ideas. They also suppose that burkini-clad women are necessarily the victims of these political systems, which force them into complying with their patriarchal laws.

Valerie Boyer, a member of the National Assembly of France, who was among those who welcomed the ban, proclaimed the burkini a “gender prison“.

The socialist government’s minister for women’s rights, Laurence Rossignol, echoed these sentiments by claiming that the burkini “is the beach version of the burqa and it has the same logic: hide women’s bodies in order to better control them”.

Both politicians enunciate a highly patronising notion: the concept of Muslim women needing to be saved. Stemming from colonial legacies, the idea of liberating veiled women by removing their veils has been deployed numerous times.

From the French colonisation of Algeria to the NATO invasion of Afghanistan, racially charged images of veiled women have constituted a vital component of Western war propaganda.

Oppressive language

Amid the burkini controversies, the media in France and across Europe has published images from the liberated Syrian town of Manjib.

The photographs depict women celebrating the departure of the Islamic State group (IS) by burning their burqas in public. Many media outlets were quick to make comparisons between burned veils and the burkini ban.

Whether talking about mandatory face-veils in war-torn Syria, or voluntary burkinis in French resorts, the media’s language about Muslim women appears strikingly similar.

Muslim women are portrayed as universally oppressed and in need of intervention from Western saviours.

This type of rhetoric gives little space for acknowledging that women not only choose to wear certain types of attire, but might also have a different definition of freedom.

While for some it might be about exposing their bodies and not being ashamed about it, for others freedom comes in the form of protecting modesty.

A Eurocentric view of the veil as a universal symbol of oppression misses the opportunity to acknowledge the diversity of female and feminist agency that comes in various shapes and forms. Burkinis can be part of that.

Pina Sadar is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at Durham University.

Originally published in The Conversation.

Topics:

fashion,

religion-and-beliefs,

islam,

france

Posted

August 26, 2016 12:08:46

The saga of St Mary’s Church and its former figurehead is the subject of a new stage show debuting as part of the Brisbane Festival.

St Mary’s, which has been operating in South Brisbane since 1859, made global headlines in 2009 when beloved long-standing priest Peter Kennedy was removed from his position.

The sacking came after the Catholic Church questioned the non-standard manner in which St Mary’s conducted mass, including practices like allowing women to preach and blessing homosexual couples.

Mr Kennedy and the majority of his 700 parishioners moved to a space a few hundred metres away from the church and set up St Mary’s in Exile.

“For us, outside of it, it was a scandal. For people inside of it, it was a traumatising event in their lives,” playwright David Burton told Terri Begley on 612 ABC Brisbane.

“Like many in Brisbane, I just remembered it as this incredibly dramatic, interesting scandal.”

St Mary’s in Exile the play retells the story of Mr Kennedy and his will to defy the Catholic Church.

“Like so many people, of whatever religion, [the story] resonated with me in terms of a local congregation dealing with this big institution,” Burton said.

“And this figure of Father Peter Kennedy at the top of it all, as this incredibly interesting, humble — or maybe not humble depending on what day you caught him — figure in Catholic Church.”

Saga caused ‘universal sadness’

When researching for the script, Burton said he expected to uncover a clear-cut “David and Goliath battle”.

“What really struck me, particularly when talking to those senior figures in the Catholic Church, was how much universal sadness was felt on all sides,” he said.

Burton consulted with Mr Kennedy and his “right-hand man” Terry Fitzpatrick, as well as senior figures in the church including Archbishop of Brisbane Mark Coleridge.

“That was a tremendous experience for me — they were incredibly gracious. I had a series of fantastic conversations with them,” Burton said.

“When you talk about schism in the Catholic Church, or any church, it is not something that is taken lightly, so I was taken back by the sadness and the sympathy Mark Coleridge felt.

“And that meant that the play has kind of evolved.”

Burton said the play tried not to take sides, instead throwing up questions of whether church is the building or the people that gather within it.

“It is a human story. It is a story about humans going through and dealing with really big, tough life questions.

“The show has ended up being very challenging … no matter what side of the fence you are on.”

Challenging and compelling show

Burton said he thought the play might ruffle some feathers, but there was also great excitement from the St Mary’s in Exile and Catholic communities.

“[It] is challenging for me to watch, and I am a secularist. I think it is challenging for everyone but compelling for that reason.”

The play opens on Saturday but has already been seen by Mr Kennedy and Mr Fitzpatrick.

“It was incredibly nerve-racking,” Burton said of the viewing, adding that it was “emotionally charged” and there were many tears.

“There was this feeling of validation … and the power and value of the truth.

“It is a big thing for a community to go through under outstanding international pressure.

“The fact that they have survived and lived on is a testament to their strength.”

Topics:

theatre,

religion-and-beliefs,

catholic,

religious-leaders,

community-organisations,

human-interest,

brisbane-4000

Posted

August 26, 2016 10:57:28

The view on your journey into work can become so familiar you can forget to step back and appreciate its beauty.

ABC photographer Nick Haggarty shared some of his favourite morning commute snaps this morning, and you responded in kind.

Here’s some of what you shared with us.

Topics:

human-interest,

photography,

australia

Posted

August 26, 2016 07:01:03

The spectacular release of Beyonce’s visual album Lemonade earlier this year, and the critical response to it, has fleetingly put the music video in the spotlight.

For a ubiquitous and influential art form, music videos tend to be easily dismissed and under-analysed, which means it took something as extreme as Beyonce’s approach — an entire album complete with extraordinary visuals and social commentary — to draw attention to them.

This Sunday, the MTV music video awards will be held at Madison Square Garden. Beyonce has received 11 nominations and there is even a new award category called Breakthrough Long Form Video, suggesting her influence continues to ripple through the industry. Adele has received eight nominations. Two videos featuring the late David Bowie, Lazarus and Blackstar, have been nominated for three awards.

Still, the lack of attention generally paid to music videos was noted at a recent event in Sydney, where a panel of music video directors gathered to discuss the state of the art form, and to celebrate the best examples in Australian video making (including award winning local clips Born Dirty by Butter, Love is My Disease by The Jezebels, and You Were Right by RUFUS).

Discussion of the music video reached its peak in the 1980s and early 1990s when these short, catchy clips accompanying pop songs exploded into popular culture. While promotional clips for songs had been produced in the 1960s and 1970s and collated on television shows like Top of the Pops and Countdown, MTV’s constant 24-hours-a-day broadcasting (which began in 1981) made music videos all but compulsory viewing and revitalised the music industry.

MTV’s change of focus from music to reality TV in the 1990s and 2000s created a perception that the music video was on the decline. But today, music videos have branched out from 3-minute clips on dedicated music channels to a variety of forms on numerous media platforms. Music video style — attention-grabbing imagery (with or without a proper narrative), fast editing, and (usually) a visual representation of the music it goes with — now influences film, television and all types on visual culture.

Music videos can be long or short, filmic or fragmented, watched on television or the internet, and also folded into feature films and narrative TV (think of the musical sequences in films like Pitch Perfect and TV shows like Glee, Empire, Nashville) and then released online as stand-alone clips.

Pitch Perfect’s Cups, for instance, is sung by lead actress Anna Kendrick when her character auditions for the Barden Bellas a capella singing group. The spinoff music video with Kendrick in character has received more than 280 million views on YouTube.

The development of the music video

The very early days of MTV saw directors grappling with what the medium could do. Directors such as Russel Mulcahey, best known for his work with Duran Duran, created spectacular and often bizarre imagery in their clips.

In this example of Mulcahey’s work from 1984, we can see what became known as the “MTV aesthetic” clearly. There is fast and constant editing. The images are suggestive of post-apocalyptic visions such as those contained in the Mad Max films. There is, however, no more than a vaguely hinted-at narrative. The visuals respond to the music and lyrics but are not entirely beholden to either.

Not all responses to the rise of MTV were positive. Criticism included the idea that pairing music with images detracted from the music itself. There was also concern about the mode of viewing that MTV promoted, which was interpreted as being more about distraction than traditional forms of television. The non-stop parade of colour, glamour, and disconnected images offered by MTV was seen as a reflection of a superficial, consumer culture.

Concern also arose about the way particular groups were represented in music videos. MTV infamously took a number of years to start playing any videos featuring black artists. (The rise of Michael Jackson was a major factor in the change in this area.) The sexualised portrayal of women in music videos also drew criticism — and has continued to do so. They can dehumanise women by reducing them to little more than attractive body parts as the Robin Thicke video for Blurred Lines exemplifies.

The 1990s saw the rise of the music video auteur, directors who developed more cohesive bodies of work. These pairings enhanced the credibility of both director and band when done well. The most prominent examples of these auteurs were Chris Cunningham, Spike Jonze, Michel Gondry and David Fincher.

This video to Aphex Twin’s Come To Daddy, directed by Cunningham in 1997, demonstrates how images can be combined with music to create something greater than the sum of its parts. Cunningham draws on imagery from horror films, and uses a bleak urban landscape to match the harsh sounds created by Aphex Twin, with the subordinated sci-fi elements of the narrative echoing the electronic music.

The music and visuals are both simultaneously futuristic and gritty. That this is a music video and not a short film is obvious in the way the sound and vision connect throughout without mirroring one another, with glitches in the vision matching the stammering rhythms.

Many of the features of this video — particularly blue filters and grotesque, distorted or disrupted representations of the human body — can be seen elsewhere in Cunningham’s work, creating a sense of connection between different pieces (for an interesting point of contrast, see his video for Madonna’s Frozen).

The music video moves online

What almost disappeared — after MTV switched its focus to reality TV — was serious academic analysis of the music video. There are only a small handful of researchers working in this area today. This is problematic because the music video is far from a dead media form, and is no less important in its popular and cultural impact than it was in the 1980s or 1990s. Videos have simply moved to different platforms and taken on new and diverse forms.

YouTube is now the primary location for music videos, with views in the tens of billions, making them one of the main ways music is consumed. Videos are also watched on streaming services, downloaded to personal devices, and can range anywhere from 3-minute clips to Lemonade’s one-hour long premiere on HBO, to Pharrell Williams’ continuous 24-hour music video Happy.

Music video’s migration from television to the internet has affected its content, aesthetics, and the way we think about pop stardom. As critic Maura Edmond points out, music video has been heavily influenced by the media convergence and web 2.0 practices of the last ten years.

In particular, the music video’s economic rationale, distribution, exhibition, reception practices and aesthetics have all been affected by its shift from television to the Internet.

While videos still appear on dedicated music channels and countdown TV shows, integrated distribution and exhibition structures such as syndicated hosting site Vevo are now the norm, as is the supply of music videos on-demand through search functions on YouTube, Tidal and Vimeo. This means participatory culture practices such as sharing, liking, commenting, making, and remaking of videos, are more commonplace for the average music fan.

Edmond argues music videos are the most-watched and “spread” content across YouTube because they fit the aesthetic demands of online video clip culture — they are short, catchy, and visually striking — and are therefore perfect viral content or spreadable media.

Gotye’s Somebody That I Used To Know is a good example of the way a simple lo-fi video can go viral.

Meanwhile, comedian Amy Schumer’s Milk Milk Lemonade shows how the parody video (a staple of YouTube culture) can look much like the real thing.

(See Nicki Minaj’s Anaconda for comparison).

This changing landscape has led to new trends in the style and aesthetics of music videos. Very high budget music videos continue to be made for those at the top of the star spectrum, and these increasingly emphasise bright colours or simple colour schemes that translate as well to small screens as large ones (see, for example, Taylor Swift’s Bad Blood).

An example of how this type of aesthetic (although not at the high end of the budget scale) can be used in creative and political ways is MIA’s Borders.

This self-directed video has stark, but beautifully framed and affecting images that use the bodies of actual refugees to illustrate MIA’s take on the current crisis in Europe.

In one shot, the lurid gold of hypothermia blankets calls to mind the greatest wealth of the West while covering the bodies of those rejected by it. This connects with the lyrics, which ask for an honest evaluation of our society’s values in relation to refugees.

A new lo-fi aesthetic

Still, overall budgets for music videos are down. For this reason, and due to technological advances, more bands are making their own lo-fi videos. In turn, even artists who have no need to make cheap videos are drawing on this lo-fi aesthetic to make an impact.

Kayne West’s video for Only One, for instance, was shot entirely on a phone camera, giving it a DIY, home-movie style well-suited to a song about his daughter. The cutting-edge filmmaker and music video auteur Michel Gondry is the director of this clip.

This changed landscape for music video aesthetics also means shifting narratives of pop music celebrity and stardom. Music videos are the primary place now for selling a musician and their music.

With the new accessibility provided by search engines and video streaming sites, they are a constantly available link to the star presence. This makes it interesting when artists decide not to be in their videos, as Sia does in most of her clips, which often feature teenage dancer Maddie Ziegler, and Justin Beiber did with most recent album Purpose.

Beiber released a series of dance clips to accompany Purpose, in collaboration with young choreographer Parris Goebel from New Zealand. The clips for PURPOSE: The Movement were released one at a time, on the hour, every hour, on November 14 2015, but can now be watched as a continuous 40-minute dance film or visual album. It has been nominated at this year’s MTV awards in the Breakthrough Long Form category.

Beiber’s removal of himself from these clips, and Goebel’s free reign on choreography and direction speak to the way music video culture is interacting with other YouTube genres, particularly in relation to dance music and choreography. (See popular choreographer Tricia Miranda’s video for Rihanna’s Bitch Better Have My Money as an example.)

The video for the lead single Sorry (nominated in three categories at the MTV awards), is extremely simple, featuring just Goebel and her brightly costumed dance crew performing to Beiber’s vocals in a blank, white, infinity space.

The immense popularity of this video is because this simplicity allows the incredible choreography to shine, rather than relying on Beiber’s star presence. It also attracts a diverse audience outside of Beiber’s dedicated tween fan base, including dance fans and Goebel followers who can watch, rewatch, learn and share the choreography.

While PURPOSE: The Movement is a triumph for Goebel, who has also worked with Nicki Minaj, Jennifer Lopez and Janet Jackson, the popularity of Sorry of course still ultimately promotes Beiber and his music. It is therefore a clever move by Beiber to diversify his fan base and star image through non-traditional means.

As a pop star who was first discovered on YouTube, Beiber is a musician made in the click, like and share era. Purpose was also his “growing up” album as he attempted to put numerous bad-boy image problems behind him. Releasing a dance film that takes the spotlight off himself works with the album’s theme of humility and is part of this rebranding.

As music videos continue to evolve they are influenced by, and influence, other visual art forms. For many people now, they are inseparable from the very experience of music.

They are a place of creative experimentation and an opportunity for film-makers to cut their teeth. They are a key platform for artists to tell us something about who they think they are.

Given the purposes they can fulfil, more thoughtful analysis of them (beyond the frequent outrages that controversial videos can produce) would be good to see.

Catherine Strong is a lecturer in Music Industry at RMIT University. Phoebe Macrossan is a doctoral candidate at the University of NSW.

Originally published in The Conversation.

Topics:

music,

arts-and-entertainment,

united-states

Posted

August 26, 2016 04:49:06

Paisley Park, the suburban Minneapolis estate and studio of late rock musician Prince, will be opened to the public from October this year, the administrator of the singer’s estate says.

Prince, 57, collapsed and died at the 6,000-square-metre estate in April after an accidental overdose of the powerful opioid fentanyl.

“Opening Paisley Park is something that Prince always wanted to do and was actively working on,” Tyka Nelson, his sister, said in a statement from Bremer Trust, which is administering his unresolved multi-million-dollar estate.

“Only a few hundred people have had the rare opportunity to tour the estate during his lifetime.

“Now, fans from around the world will be able to experience Prince’s world for the first time as we open the doors to this incredible place.”

An application for development review and a business plan have been submitted to Chanhassen officials, the statement said.

Guided tours will include the main floor of Paisley Park, including recording and mixing studios.

Visitors will also be able to see video editing suites, rehearsal rooms, the private NPG Music Club, a soundstage and concert hall, and items from Prince’s personal archives.

Tickets will go on sale on Friday for tours starting October 6.

Media reports on Monday said that pills containing fentanyl were seized from Prince’s home after his death but they were mislabelled hydrocodone.

Prince’s hits included Purple Rain and When Doves Cry.

Reuters

Topics:

music,

arts-and-entertainment,

united-states

Listen